The performing arts publisher

Search

quick | advanced

 

My Cart

Items : 0
Sub total : $0.00

View Cart 
Shipping Policy

Australian Screen Classics


You might also be interested in...

Sort by: 
12
Alvin Purple
$15.45 ex GST
$16.99 inc GST

Alvin Purple

Australian Screen Classics

Catharine Lumby
 
One of the seminal films of the 1970s, Alvin Purple depicts Alvin’s struggles with his irresistibility to women—from his school days and time as a waterbed salesman to his short-lived career as a sex therapist. The ‘definitive ocker comedy’, Alvin Purple survived a critical mauling and went on to become the most commercially successful Australian film of the 1970s.

Catharine Lumby takes a fresh look at the film, the social and political era in which it was made and the forces that fuelled its success. She revisits claims that the movie is little more than an exercise in sexploitation and argues that the film is far more complex than its detractors have allowed.

 

Alvin Purple is the 9th title in the Australian Screen Classics Series co-published with the National Film and Sound Archive. 

   Resources

   Review
  • A wonderful read: I feel like I've been excavated and carbon dated  . -  Graeme Blundell  
    eBook available from















 






Currency Press | 978-0-86819-844-6 | Sales rights: worldwide | PB
Back of Beyond, The
$15.45 ex GST
$16.99 inc GST

Back of Beyond, The

Australian Screen Classics

Sylvia Lawson
 
The Back of Beyond celebrates the life and times of Australia’s best known outback mail man Tom Kruse MBE. Every fortnight he battled isolation, heat, sand dunes and floods to deliver mail and supplies to the families along the 517 kilometre Birdsville Track in central Australia.

Representing the complex interrelations of the multicultural community and their environs, the film is considered by many to be one of Australia’s premier films, and is an exemplary representation of 1950s Australian transformational culture.

The Back of Beyond is the 15th title in the Australian Screen Classics series, co-published with the National Film and Sound Archive.




Currency Press | 978-0-86819-975-7 | Sales rights: worldwide | PB
Barry McKenzie Movies, The
$15.45 ex GST
$16.99 inc GST

Barry McKenzie Movies, The

Australian Screen Classics

Tony Moore
 

When The Adventures of Barry McKenzie burst onto the Australian screen in 1972 it created a furore. With ‘Bazza’ (Barry Crocker), the chundering, Fosters-sucking innocent abroad, Barry Humphries and Bruce Beresford created a foil for the audiences. The movie triggered a riotous sequel, Barry McKenzie Holds His Own, and a wave of ocker comedies that celebrate and critique the Australian national character. With irrepressible humour and sharp-witted insight, Tony Moore explores the subversive satire of the films, their influence on his generation, and what they have to say today.

 

Review
As Prime Minister I demonstrated my gift for ridicule by granting my only imperial honour to the intrinsically conservative Barry Humprhries. It’s time for a book that has fun with the political satire of Barry McKenzie - The Hon. E.G. Whitlam AC, QC

The Barry McKenzie Movies
is the 5th titles in the Australian Screen Classics series, co-published with the National Film and Sound Archive.



Currency Press | 978-0-86819-748-7 | Sales rights: worldwide | PB
Boys, The
$15.45 ex GST
$16.99 inc GST

Boys, The

Australian Screen Classics

Andrew Frost
 
Lauded by many as one of the most powerful Australian films made in the past 20 years, Rowan Woods’ stunning debut feature The Boys touched off a storm of media controversy upon its release in 1998. 

The film evoked vivid memories of the 1986 rape and murder of a young Sydney woman named Anita Cobby. Although Woods’ film was fictional, The Boys remains inextricably connected to its real-life counterpart in the minds of many viewers.

But that connection is only part of the story behind the making of The Boys. In this thoughtful and thought-provoking essay, Andrew Frost contextualises the major thematic concerns of the film into the broader context of social anxieties about violence, crime and morality.

Frost chronicles his own personal journey with the film and its makers from art school to the underground Super 8 filmmaking scene of Sydney in the mid-1980s, from the early short films of director Woods to the multiple award-winning The Boys. Frost discovers new aspects of The Boys even today and wonders if its stinging moral message has been heard among the clamour of
everyday suburban life.

 

The Boys
is the 10th titles in the Australian Screen Classics series, co-published with the National Film and Sound Archive.

    eBook available from

 

  












Currency Press | 978-0-86819-862-0 | Sales rights: worldwide | PB
Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith, The
$15.45 ex GST
$16.99 inc GST

Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith, The

Australian Screen Classics

Henry Reynolds
 
Set in central-western New South Wales in the 1890s, Fred Schepisi’s film of Thomas Keneally’s award-winning novel is a powerful and confronting story of a black man’s revenge against an unjust and intolerant society.  

Raised by missionaries, Jimmie Blacksmith, a young half-caste Aboriginal man, is poignantly caught between the ways of his black forefathers and those of the white society to which he aspires. Exploited by his boss and betrayed by his [white] wife, he declares war on his white employers and goes on a violent killing spree.

The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith was one of the most significant films of the 1970s ‘renaissance’. It was the first Australian feature in which the whole story is told from an Aboriginal perspective and it broke new ground in dealing with one of the most tragic aspects of Australian history: the racist treatment of the Aboriginal population. The spectre of the violent and vengeful black had barely been touched upon and the depth of rage that the film put on screen was unprecedented in Australian film at the time.

 

Review
A timely and very important work - Sean Gorman, Senses of Cinema

The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith is the 8th title in the Australian Screen Classics series, co-published with the National Film and Sound Archive.



Currency Press | 978-0-86819-824-8 | Sales rights: Australia/NZ | PB
Devil’s Playground, The
$15.45 ex GST
$16.99 inc GST

Devil’s Playground, The

Australian Screen Classics

Christos Tsiolkas
 

Fred Schepisi’s film, The Devil’s Playground, is an intimate portrait of a 13-year-old boy struggling in spirit and body with the constraints of living in a Catholic seminary. It is also the story of how the Brothers cope with the demands of their faith. Made in 1976, this semi-autobiographical film established Schepisi as one of Australia’s most talented directors and was one of the first Australian films to be selected for Directors’ Fortnight at the Cannes Film Festival.

Christos Tsiolkas invites you to share his twenty-five year journey of viewing, reviewing and re-imagining the film. He remembers his first illicit experience of the film at age thirteen and describes how his views of it changed in later years. As he chronicles the impact of The Devil’s Playground on the development of his sense of self and of his love of cinema, he also explores the sexuality, politics, history and aesthetics of the film.

A passionate tribute to the power and possibilities of cinema.

  

The Devil's Playground is the 1st title in the Australian Screen Classics series, co-published with the National Film and Sound Archive. 

Currency Press | 978-0-86819-671-8 | Sales rights: Australia/NZ | PB
Jedda
$15.45 ex GST
$16.99 inc GST

Jedda

Australian Screen Classics

Jane Mills
 
Filmed in 1955 Jedda was the first Australian feature film to use Aboriginal actors in lead roles, the first to be filmed in colour and the first to be shown at the Cannes film festival.

It tells the tragic story of a young Aboriginal girl of the Arunte tribe, adopted by a white woman, Sarah McCann, as a surrogate for her own baby who has died. She raises her as a white child, isolating her from Aboriginal contact. But when Marbuck, an Aboriginal man seeking work arrives on the station, Jedda is fascinated by him.

Jedda was one of several popular melodramas of the post-World War II era that dealt with miscegenation. Mills explores these themes and the representation of the Australian Aborigine, while making comparisons to the Native American sub-genre of the Hollywood Western.

Jedda is the 14th title in the Australian Screen Classics series, co-published with National Film and Sound Archive.

  

 

Currency Press | 978-0-86819-920-7 | Sales rights: worldwide | PB
Mad Dog Morgan
$15.45 ex GST
$16.99 inc GST

Mad Dog Morgan

Australian Screen Classics

Jake Wilson
 
Mad Dog Morgan was a risky project on every level: artistic, financial, psychological and physical. What made the risks worth taking? What was at stake for the film's makers-- and for Australian cinema?

Released in 1976 at the peak of the Australian film revival, Philippe Mora's dramatisation of the bloody life and death of the nation's most infamous bushranger stands at the crossroads of multiple genres and trends: a violent action movie, an excavation of a traumatic colonial past, an antipodean variant on the 'acid Western', and a radical experiment with echoes of Bertolt Brecht and Jean-Luc Godard. Morgan himself is seen as a ruthless avenger, yet also a helpless victim--a paradox brought to life in the gonzo lead performance by Dennis Hopper, backed by an extraordinary supporting cast including Jack Thompson, David Gulpilil, Bill Hunter, John Hargreaves and Frank Thring.

Jake Wilson's thoroughly researched book takes a fresh look at the historical Dan Morgan as well as the film's colourful production history and its significance in the wayward career trajectories of its director and star. Above all, it interrogates the creative risk-taking drive that made the film, like the man himself, into the legend that it is.

   eBook available from

               
Currency Press | 978-1-92500-520-2 | Sales rights: worldwide  | PB
Mad Max Movies, The
$15.45 ex GST
$16.99 inc GST

Mad Max Movies, The

Australian Screen Classics

Adrian Martin
 

‘No other Australian films have influenced world cinema and popular culture as widely and lastingly as George Miller’s Mad Max trilogy’

So writes leading film writer Adrian Martin in this sparkling new appreciation of the movies that rudely shook up Australian cinema and made Mel Gibson and George Miller internationally famous.

Martin compares the three movies sharing his views on which works best and why. In a chapter dedicated to each film, he looks at their critical reception and their themes, examines shooting techniques and provides a shot-by-shot of integral scenes.

Since Mad Max roared onto cinema screens in 1979, the films have developed a worldwide cult following and provoked numerous debates as to their meaning: are the films a study of masculinity in crisis, an investigation of good versus evil, a celebration of the Western (with wheels) or a frightening vision of the post apocalypse?

 

Review
Max lovers, your definitive fix has arrived. -  Empire

The Mad Max Movies is the 2nd title in the Australian Screen Classics series, co-published with the National Film and Sound Archive.


Currency Press | 978-0-86819-670-1 | Sales rights: Australia/NZ | PB
Piano, The
$15.45 ex GST
$16.99 inc GST

Piano, The

Australian Screen Classics

Gail Jones
 

The Piano, written and directed by Jane Campion, is one of the most honoured films of the new Australian cinema, and is considered by many critics to be a modern masterpiece. Campion won the Palme D'Or at Cannes in 1993 for the film, making her the first woman ever to win this prestigious award; it also won Best Original Screenplay (Campion), Best Actress (Holly Hunter) and Best Supporting Actress (Anna Paquin) at the 1994 Oscars.

In 1880 the widowed, and mute, Ada (Holly Hunter) and her young daughter, Flora (Anna Paquin) leave their native Scotland and travel to New Zealand’s remote South Island, as the arranged family of Stewart (Sam Neil), an Englishman who lives and works the land there. With them come Ada’s piano which serves as her outlet of expression, her ‘voice’. Despite fierce insistence from Ada, Stewart leaves the piano on the beach after he decides it is too heavy to carry back to his homestead. Stewart’s neighbour Baines (Harvey Kietel) makes a deal with Stewart for the piano and lessons with Ada, which has dire repercussions for them all.

The Piano is the 6th title in the Australian Screen Classics series, co-published with the National Film and Sound Archive.


Currency Press | 978-0-86819-799-9 | Sales rights: Australia/NZ | PB
12