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Empire Actors, The
$59.05 ex GST
$64.96 inc GST

Empire Actors, The

Stars of Australasian Costume Drama 1890s – 1920s

Veronica Kelly
 

In the decades from Federation to the 1920s live entertainment was an integral part of the Imperial world, and performers the first generation of truly global marketeers. In epic tales of royal splendour and Napoleonic conquest, of heroic gladiators and Christian sacrifice, of musketeers and courtesans, hussars and doomed princesses, Arab houris and Oriental mandarins, international stage celebrities transported Australasian audiences into identification with the older, more powerful civilizations from which they had come.

These stars travelled the world in style, carrying messages of trade, fashion, tourism, modernity and the privilege of being a member of the British Empire.



Currency House | 978-0-98056-329-0 | Sales rights: Australia/NZ | HB
Lords & Larrikins
$49.95 ex GST
$54.95 inc GST

Lords & Larrikins

The Actor's Role in the Making of Australia

Kath Leahy
 

This radical new account of the male performer in public life reveals for the first time his central importance to Australian society and character. From our first Hamlet, to Laurence Olivier’s lordly post-war tour, the aspiring middle-classes turned to actors to each them public behaviour and political opinion.  From the first moment in 1830 when little Barnett Levey was denied access to his own stage, class has been the divide between high art and low comedy. Imperial Shakespeare was the principal weapon in this war, drawing in patrons, politicians and critics, while in the vaudeville houses comedians like Roy Rene upheld the right to a working-class Australia. Then, in 1970, just as public funding fuelled again the rise of a high-art culture, a bevy of buffoons led a new assault to subvert it. Kath Leahy asks some penetrating questions about why the cultural cringe lasted so long, and why, even today, we still call for control of the public artist.



Currency House | 978-0-98056-322-1 | Sales rights: Australia/NZ | HB
Lords & Larrikins
$31.77 ex GST
$34.95 inc GST

Lords & Larrikins

The Actor's Role in the Making of Australia

Kath Leahy
 

This radical new account of the male performer in public life reveals for the first time his central importance to Australian society and character. From our first Hamlet, to Laurence Olivier’s lordly post-war tour, the aspiring middle-classes turned to actors to each them public behaviour and political opinion.  From the first moment in 1830 when little Barnett Levey was denied access to his own stage, class has been the divide between high art and low comedy. Imperial Shakespeare was the principal weapon in this war, drawing in patrons, politicians and critics, while in the vaudeville houses comedians like Roy Rene upheld the right to a working-class Australia. Then, in 1970, just as public funding fuelled again the rise of a high-art culture, a bevy of buffoons led a new assault to subvert it. Kath Leahy asks some penetrating questions about why the cultural cringe lasted so long, and why, even today, we still call for control of the public artist.



Currency House | 978-0-98056-323-8 | Sales rights: Australia/NZ | PB
Networking
$63.63 ex GST
$69.99 inc GST

Networking

Commercial Television in Australia

Nick Herd
 

Australia’s  first comprehensive history of the founding and growth of our commercial  television – from single stations to powerful national networks – and of its  ancillary industries in newsmaking, production, advertising.






Currency House | 978-0-98079-826-5 | Sales rights: Australia/NZ | HB
Parsons Lectures, The
$19.95 ex GST
$21.95 inc GST

Parsons Lectures, The

The Philip Parsons Memorial Lectures on the Performing Arts 1993-2003

Katharine Brisbane (ed)
 

The edited texts of Philip Parsons Memorial Lectures on the performing arts, 1993-2003, given by Neil Armfield, Katharine Brisbane, John Derum, Wayne Harrison, Robyn Nevin, Stephen Page, and Richard Wherrett.







Currency House | 978-0-95812-132-3 | Sales rights: Australia/NZ | PB
Platform Papers 1
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$14.95 inc GST

Platform Papers 1

'Our ABC' a Dying Culture?: One Way Forward for Arts Programming

Martin Harrison
 

Recent ABC programming is causing growing disquiet, that quality is giving way to ratings. Is the national public broadcaster short-selling the regions and cutting its coverage of the arts in favour of cheap studio game shows? ABC TV no longer has a primetime arts program, the audio program The Listening Room has been abolished, there is little original music and dance programming on ABC television; the online arts portal, ‘The Space’, is no longer maintained.

Martin Harrison investigates these changes and proposes a radical way forward.

Currency House | 978-0-95812-124-8 | Sales rights: Australia/NZ | PB
Platform Papers 10
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Platform Papers 10

Satire—or Sedition?: The Threat to National Insecurity

Jonathan Biggins
 

Satirist and broadcaster Jonathan Biggins shows how the history of the Wharf Revue has charted the erosion of the democratic tradition of parliamentary debate in Australia and continues to answer the call for an oppositional viewpoint. The most insidious threat to free speech implied by the recently reinvigorated sedition laws, he asserts, lies in self-censorship.



Currency House | 978-0-97573-016-4 | Sales rights: Australia/NZ | PB
Platform Papers 11
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Platform Papers 11

A Regional State of Mind: Making Art Outside Metropolitan Australia

Lyndon Terracini
 

 

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What is the culture of our place, of our backyard? Lyndon Terracini, a baritone who spent thirty years in the opera houses of Europe before settling in the NSW town of Lismore, reveals the rich diversity of Australia’s country-town culture and makes a strong plea for its right to the same respect as metropolitan culture. With the rapid demographic changes presently taking place, he writes, our European traditions are fast becoming irrelevant. Preservation of our stories is as essential to our survival as our flora and fauna.

Terracini was director of the Queensland Music Festival 2000–2005 and of the 2006 Brisbane Festival. He has spent many months in the outback and in small towns, building huge collaborative performance works in which whole districts participated. He describes the commissioning of music and texts, the mixing of star practitioners with local workers, and the way the communities took ownership. A creative culture, he argues, can be life-changing.


Currency House | 978-0-97573-019-5 | Sales rights: Australia/NZ | PB
Platform Papers 12: Film in the Age of Digital Distribution
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Platform Papers 12: Film in the Age of Digital Distribution

Richard Harris
 

Australian audiovisual production faces an uncertain future. The recent proliferation of new forms of digital delivery is both a promise and a threat to the screen content business and poses challenges to established forms of government intervention. Many ambitious predictions have been made about the impact on the Australian media landscape and the explosion of sites like YouTube and the investment of media moguls like Murdoch and Packer suggest profound change is taking place. But where does Australian content—our stories—stand? Recent media legislation debate was all about technology; the issue of content was notably absent. This is of serious concern because the fracturing of the media sector and copyright laws, globalisation of production and distribution, have the potential to undermine the existing structure for the creation, production and distribution of Australian material.


Currency House | 978-0-98028-020-3 | Sales rights: Australia/NZ | PB
Platform Papers 13
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Platform Papers 13

Cross-racial Casting: Changing the Faces of Australian Theatre

Lee Lewis
 

Mainstream theatre in Australia is very white. Too white. Why are we falling behind the rest of the theatrical world in seeing complex diverse casts onstage in our major theatre companies? When you ask this question of theatre practitioners, an awful discourse of blame begins: agents blame casting directors, drama schools blame ‘the industry’, everyone blames artistic directors. Talking about racism in Australia is difficult in the climate of indignant denial. Our vocabulary and strategies for discussing it publicly have become inadequate.

This essay argues that aggressive cross-racial casting of the classical repertoire is a strategy for subverting the ‘inevitability’ of white-centric theatre. It is an important step in the necessary transformation of mainstream theatre into a cultural territory which is fully engaged with the socio-political perplexities of representing Australia on stage and screen. It offers a practical contribution to the re-imaging of the national identity and thus to the construction of an inclusive national imaginary in the future.



Currency House | 978-0-98028-021-0 | Sales rights: Australia/NZ | PB
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